Publications

Keeping the Faith in Interfaith Relationships
In Keeping the Faith in Interfaith Relationships, Stuart Dauermann calls for a reconsideration of the long held assumption that a Jew who believes in Jesus exits from Jewish life. Dauermann represents Jesus, not as an exit, but as an entrance into more serious engagement with Jewish life. The implications of this perspective for interfaith couples, both Christians and Jews, are profound. 

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Christians and Jews Together
In Christians and Jews Together, Stuart Dauermann challenges Christians and Jews to discover new ways to partner together in serving what God is up to in the world. He imaginatively connects the thinking of Paul the Apostle with the Prophet Ezekiel, forming a previously unexplored bridge between Jews and Christians. This is an excellent resource for Christians seeking new ways to understand and share their faith within the context of deep respect for their Jewish neighbors, relatives, and friends.  

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Son of David
“When Rabbi Dauermann asked me to read ‘Son of David,’ I read the whole thing at once and called him right away. I told him this was the message people needed to hear regarding Yeshua (Jesus), the Jewish people, Messsianic Judaism, and Jewish-Christian relations. Christians reading this can see palpably what has been lost through the centuries of forgetting that Jesus is the Son of David, a present office, not a dead title. To the Jewish world, we in Messianic Judaism might say it is our prayer that they would see why Yeshua is the center for us of our Judaism, our hope, our avodah. For those who love the people descended from Abraham as well as the people of the world, Yeshua as the Son of David is the one who brings healing and the reign of God to Israel and the nations.”
—Rabbi Derek Lehman, Tikvat David, Atlanta
author of ‘Yeshua in Context’ and ‘The World to Come’ 

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The Rabbi as a Surrogate Priest
“There are many aspects to this task of rabbinic training, but four closely related questions rise to the surface as requiring primary attention. The first is a question of description: What ought to be the functions performed by a messianic Jewish rabbi? The second is a question of legitimacy: What similarities exist between the functions performed by messianic Jewish rabbis and rabbis in the wider Jewish context such that the rabbinate in both contexts may legitimately be seen to be variations on the same theme, and the messianic Jewish rabbinate therefore legitimately a rabbinate? The third is a question of differentiation: How and why are the functions performed by a messianic Jewish rabbi contextually particularistic and therefore different from those performed byChristian clergy? In other words, how is a messianic rabbi more than just a Protestant Pastor with switched labels? The fourth is a question of biblicity: Is there biblical justification or precedent for the proposed paradigm of the rabbi as a surrogate priest?
Each of these questions emerges from messianic Judaism’s interaction with different but overlapping audiences. The question of description is addressed primarily to the messianic Jewish context. The question of legitimacy is addressed primarily to the wider Jewish world. The question of differentiation is addressed primarily to the church world. The question of biblicity is addressed both to the messianic Jewish context and the church world. And in all cases, looking over our shoulder is the general public.”
—from the Prologue 

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